Tag Archives: retina

Post-Election Advocacy Briefing

It is far too soon to know where the dust will settle on many issues impacting our practices. What we can clarify for USRetina members is that no “stop work” directives have been issued to CMS staff as of this publication. In other words, all initiatives underway are still moving forward. However, everyone knows that a key item on President-elect Trump’s agenda is the repeal of the Affordable Care Act or at least the repeal of components of it.

CMMI, its funding, and demonstrations are most definitely in the cross-hairs. The proposed Part B demonstration is a CMMI/Affordable Care Act demonstration. It is still too early to know if the current administration will try to move it through quickly or abandon it.

Importantly, the MACRA initiative or Quality Payment Program is part of a separate piece of legislation to replace the old SGR. Therefore, it is not at risk at this point; however, the rules could be modified under the new administration.

The USRetina advocacy team will continue to keep members updated about our ongoing efforts in the coming days.

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Dr. Kourous Rezaei of Illinois Retina Associates Moderates International Survey Revealing Global Differences Among Retina Specialists

A recent “global trends” survey, moderated by Dr. Kourous A. Rezaei, ASRS International Affairs Committee Member and retinal physician at Illinois Retina Associates, has revealed significant discrepancies in practice between retina specialists in the United States and those in other regions. The survey gathered responses from over 1,100 retina physicians from a total of 40 medical societies, including the American Society of Retina Specialists.

The results revealed that retina specialists in the United States take a different approach to managing endophthalmities after intravitreal injection, compared with physicians in nearly every other global region.

“This, I think, is a big discrepancy between the U.S. and Europe,” says Dr. Rezaei in a recent article, “and also almost the rest of the world, where most of them do vitrectomy.”

72% of U.S. respondents said they would handle such cases with a tap and inject strategy. In every other region, less than 50% of respondents gave the same response. In most regions, pars plata vitrectomy is the most commonly used treatment strategy.

This wasn’t the only survey question to illustrate a difference between the US and the rest of the world. Another question asked whether visual acuity improves then stabilizes, or improves before declining in patients on long-term VEGF therapy. A majority of US respondents, 64.1%, said that visual acuity stabilized.

“This is the opposite of what the real-world data indicate,” notes Dr. Rezaei. To view the full survey, click here.

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